Exploring Lviv

Most Memorable Event - Arena Lviv Opening Ceremony

Lviv Lion Awards 2011

Issue 41, December 2011.
As another action-packed year in Ukraine’s cultural capital draws to a close, we present you with our annual awards for the people, places and events which have helped make the past twelve months in Lviv memorable. Wishing all Leopolitans a very merry Christmas and a happy New Year!

Lviv – the Coffee Mecca of Ukraine

Issue 38, September 2011.
Coffee is massive in Lviv. Right now there are nearly 700 coffee houses. In Lviv , they are known as ‘kavyarnya’ or "knajpa’ (their name from Austro-Hungarian times) ‘kawa’, a direct translation or even the tender ‘kawusya’. Talk of instant coffee is prohibited.

Trumpets Sound Out

Issue 37, July 2011.
In May, Lviv marked its 755th Anniversary by reviving the ancient trumpets of Rynok Square. The renowned composer, Yuri Lanuk has created a series of versions of the Lviv ‘City Melody’, the unofficial anthem of the Lion’s City, to cater for many different civic occasions. A jazz version was particularly well received by the audience at Alfa Jazz Festival!

Coat of arms of Lviv

Issue 36, June 2011.
The Coat of arms of the city of Lviv fea¬tures a golden lion beneath a city gate in a blue field. The current version of the symbol was adopted by the city council in 1990. According to principles of the blazoning it features a lion passant Or, beneath a castle gate Or, in azure field.

Olympic Ambition

Issue 31, January 2011.
Flush with the relative success of their Euro 2012 preparations and no doubt goaded by the bragging of neighbouring Russia with its 2018 World Cup and 2014 Winter Olympics, Ukraine’s officials have recently begun talking up the chances of an Olympic Games of their own. The good news for Leopolitans is that Lviv is the designated venue for this ambitious Ukrainian bid to host the 2022 Winter Olympics. Such lofty ambitions may seem a touch farfetched to many readers familiar with everyday life in the West Ukrainian capital, but a Leopolitan Olympics is not actually as much of a stretch as it might appear at first glance. After all, the massive infrastructure works currently underway ahead of Euro 2012 will bring the city’s transport connections more or less up to scratch, providing Lviv’s bid with everything it needs in terms of communications to host a Winter Olympic Games.

Bandera, Stalin and Ukraine’s memory wars

Issue 31, January 2011.
Lviv Today publisher Peter Dickinson asks who really benefits from reopening Ukraine’s historical wounds Over 65 years since the world’s most brutal conflict officially came to an end, modern Ukrainians remain hopelessly trapped in the ideological mire of WWII and stuck in a debilitating memory war which shows no signs of abating. The 2004 Orange Revolution sparked the latest outbreak of hostilities with its attempts to rehabilitate Ukraine’s WWII era independence fighters.

Lion Awards 2010

Issue 30, December 2010.
The best of the past year in Ukrain’es cultural capital

Exploring Uzhgorod Ukraine’s Central European enclave

Issue 29, November 2010.
Hidden far away behind the Carpathian Mountains is one of Ukraine’s most picturesque and hospitable cities
Kevin Taylor, Group Vice President, World Travel Awards Udo Heine, Managing Dire

Lviv hotel named Ukraine’s No. 1

Issue 28, October 2010.
Early October saw Lviv’s Leopolis Hotel named as the 2010 Hotel of the Year at the prestigious annual World Travel Awards. Leopolis Hotel General Manager Udo Heine spoke to Lviv Today about what this breakthrough means for the hotel and for the Lviv region hospitality and tourism sector in general.

Dry nights ahead for Lviv drinkers New local regulations will ban all over-the-counter alcohol sales after 10pm

Issue 28, October 2010.
In a bid to combat a rising tide of alcoholically fuelled anti-social behaviour in the city, the Lviv authorities recently unveiled new regulations restricting the sale of alcohol from 22.00 until 10.00 daily. The new regulations, which will not affect licensed premises such as bars and restaurants but will instead target kiosks, convenience stores and supermarkets, are part of broader efforts in Lviv to address the problem of alcohol abuse and make the city a more pleasant place to be at night. Retailers have promised to challenge the legality of the new regulations in the courts, but the move has been warmly received by cultural figures and tourism sector representatives who see it as a civilizing step towards modern European norms.